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Archive for January 28, 2016

Hitler Was Not Anti-Semitic or Anti Slavic But Anti Turkish

Hitler Was Not Anti-Semitic or Anti Slavic But Anti Turkish

Hitler Was Not Anti-Semitic or Anti Slavic But Anti Turkish

Hitler and the Nazi were against the Khazar Ashkenazi Jews in Germany and in the Slavic Eastern Europe who claimed late conversion to Judaism.

It is impossible to tell if Hitler knew that they are not Semites or Israelite, but only new Asian Jews. The original Semitic Israeli nation was shocked and was terrified and the Turkish Khazar Jews knew and manipulated this situation for their interests.

Calling Hitler’s and Nazi’s actions against Turkic Khazar Jews as Anti-Antisemitism is ironic since the Khazar Ashkenazi Jews are not Semites at all.

The Ashkenazi Jews are systematically trying to deny that their true origin and the origin of their Yiddish Language are Turkic Khazar. They claim that their Zionist ambitions and businesses are legitimate, nationalistic and religiously related to Judaism.

Yiddish was the everyday language of most Jews in Eastern Europe (Poland, Russia, Lithuania, Latvia, Romania, and parts of Hungary and Czechoslovakia) for 1,000 years.

The term “Yiddish” is derived from the German word for “Jewish.” The most accepted (but not the only) theory of the origin of Yiddish is that it began to take shape by the 10th century as Jews from France and Italy migrated to the Rhine Valley. They developed a language that included elements of Hebrew, and French, Italian, and German dialects. In the late middle Ages, when Jews settled in Eastern Europe, Slavic elements were incorporated into Yiddish.

Mutual intelligibility:

In linguistics, mutual intelligibility is a relationship between languages or dialects in which speakers of different but related varieties can readily understand each other without intentional study or special effort.
As for: Azerbaijani, Crimean Tatar, Gagauz, Turkish and Urum (partially and asymmetrically
And also for: German and Yiddish

Yiddish language is clearly was made by the Khazar Ashkenazi Jews in Germany in the same way which they produced the Ladino language in Spain.
Judeo-Spanish is commonly referred to as Ladino. Ladino is a language derived from medieval Spanish, with influences from other languages such as Aragonese, Astur-Leonese, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese, and Mozarabic. Ladino also has vocabulary from Ottoman Turkish, Hebrew, Aramaic and Arabic, French, Italian, Greek, Bulgarian and Serbo-Croatian.

”Turkey: A Ladino newspaper”, Tracing the Tribe: The Jewish Genealogy Blog posted:
The new [Turkish] government promoted Turkish [language] and suppressed [the] Kurdish [language]. Ladino was not suppressed, but according to scholars, the community itself helped to suppress it.

Turkic History in 6-minute video

 “The Thirteenth Tribe” by Arthur Koestler (more…)